Stokenchurch

Stokenchurch

Stokenchurch is a village and commune in the district of Wycombe in Buckinghamshire, England. With its own connection point to the south of the village just passing M40 (Exit 5) and the resulting good connection to the 35 miles south-east London, it has also become a popular commuter residence. The population is nevertheless well below 5,000; the community has remained rural. Stokenchurch is located in the Chiltern Hills, about three miles south of Chinnor in Oxfordshire, ten kilometers west of High Wycombe. It is a church of the Anglican Church with the Church of St. Peter and Paul and a Methodist Church. The place and its name are believed to be of Anglo-Saxon origin, 1086 Stokenchurch is mentioned as a forest area of ​​the village of Aston Rowant six kilometers away, traditions from the 13th century refer to it as "Stockenechurch" from. Until the 19th century the village was a popular resting place and horse-changing place for carriages and riders on the way between London and Oxford; a number of pubs, restaurants and stables had settled. The landmark Stokenchurchs, the King's Hotel (formerly known as "The King's Arms Hotel") dates back to that time, when King Charles II allegedly stayed with his lover in the 17th century. The original link road today is a bridle path called Colliers Lane, after a new road (Oxford Road) was created in 1824. In 1896 Stokenchurch came from Oxfordshire to Buckinghamshire and became a center of chair manufacturing. In the 1930s, there were eight companies that made chairs for sale to large furniture manufacturers. Nevertheless, the agricultural population always prevailed.

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