Fleetwood

Fleetwood is an English town north of Blackpool in Lancashire, England. The town lies at the northern end of the Fylde peninsula at the mouth of the River Wyre in the Morecambe Bay. The inhabitants in 2001 was nearly 27,000. The present city was founded in 1836 by Peter Hesketh, and mainly designed by Decimus Burton. Excavations have yielded traces of settlement from the Iron Age in the area of ​​today's Fleetwood and it is believed that the Roman Portus Sentorium has also found at this location, although direct evidence endure so far. Fleetwood is considered the first planned city of the Victorian age. Peter Hesketh, an MP for Preston, recognized the tourist potential of the area, from which you can see on the Morecambe Bay to the mountains of the Lake District. What was missing was a railway, and so he drove the Preston and Wyre Railway progress that should make its local foundation for the people of Manchester and Liverpool accessible. This railway line was opened in July 1840th Fleetwood lost his last railway connection 1970. The railway connection made Fleetwood not only as a resort attractive, but also for the port he was important because so goods over Fleetwood on land and on ships could be transported. The port of Fleetwood is secured in an unusual way of two lighthouses, the Beach Lighthouse and the Pharos Lighthouse. The construction of the Manchester Ship Canal, however, the movement of goods through the port lost its importance. With the establishment of a railway line from Preston to neighboring Blackpool whose importance grew as a seaside resort and Fleetwood became a relatively peaceful place, which is also associated with a still operational tram line with Blackpool since the 1890s. The first fully automatic telephone exchange in England was taken on 15 July 1922 in Fleetwood in operation. Fleetwood The best times were in the early 20th century, when it was one of the most important fishing ports of the region. 1910 a pier was built to promote tourism; the pier burned down in 2008. Today Fleetwood is threatened by the decline of domestic tourism and the declining income from fishing. Since 1982 there in the wake of the "cod war" between Britain and Iceland no longer deep-sea fishing in the region. Fleetwood is the seat of the company Lofthouse of Fleetwood, which is known for the pastilles Fisherman's Friend.

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