Liechtenstein

Liechtenstein

Liechtenstein

Liechtenstein [lɪçtn̩ˌʃtaɪ̯n] (officially the Principality of Liechtenstein; liechtensteinerisch: Förschtatum Liachtaschta, Füarstatum Liachtastoo, For Tatum Liachtastei) is a principality and landlocked country in the Alps in Central Europe. The sixth smallest country in the world has a constitutional hereditary monarchy on a democratic and parliamentary basis. The house Liechtenstein, the Reigning Prince. Sovereignty is divided into Liechtenstein equally between prince and people. The Alpine Rhine forms the west, the boundary between the Alpine countries Liechtenstein and Switzerland; in the East the principality bordering Austria. The state is divided into two constituencies and eleven municipalities. The capital and royal residence is Vaduz. The area's largest town is Triesenberg and the most populous town is Schaan. The highly cultured north (Unterland) and the less cultivated south (Oberland) characterize the landscape of the principality. Liechtenstein, with about 37,500 inhabitants, is the smallest state in the German language. German is the official and also the national language. The proportion of foreigners is just under 34 percent. The principality belonged to the Holy Roman Empire of the German nation, the Confederation of the Rhine and the German Confederation. In August 1806, became independent and is subject to administrative and economic ties since 1923 and a customs treaty with neighboring Switzerland. Liechtenstein is a member of the United Nations (UN) and the European Economic Area (EEA), heard, like Switzerland, not the European Union (EU) on. The state was known as a tax haven. The Liechtenstein tax affair and offshore leaks have contributed to Liechtenstein in November 2013 international agreement to prevent tax evasion ( "OECD / Council of Europe Convention") signed.